The Tomorrow Man will leave you feeling anything but emotions

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The Tomorrow Man will leave you feeling anything but emotions

Imagine spending a life so fully fixated on the future that you forget how to experience moments in the present. 

Imagine becoming so immersed in physical items that emotional, human connection makes your mind twirl into a jumbled disaster of stress and panic.  

In Noble Jones’ new drama The Tomorrow Man, this is exactly the situation for the lonely and quirky senior citizens Ed Hemsler (John Lithgow) and Ronnie Meisner (Blythe Danner). 

Despite the casting of two outstanding actors for the lead roles, The Tomorrow Man lacked any form of chemistry, and frankly, any true purpose at all. As the film drew to a close, the predictable, and even slightly abrupt, ending simply left me feeling no emotion at all. 

While I had hoped that The Tomorrow Man would be a fresh and compelling romantic drama, I can not find myself ever recommending it as a must-see for movie night.”

For years of his somber life, Ed has spent each precious day preparing for a potential natural disaster. Whether it be stocking panic rooms with rows of food and gasoline or becoming deeply immersed in political chat rooms, Ed spends every waking moment in fear of an unpredictable future. During his frequent trips to the local grocery store, a widowed woman known as Ronnie catches the constantly roaming eye of Ed. After a painfully awkward first date, the pair jump into an innocent relationship in which they soon find much common ground within their peculiar lives. 

After living practically secluded from the rest of society, allowing each other into their lives is an uncomfortable step for the pair in their newly blossoming romance. Ed’s persistent battle with anxiety and the truly dirty secrets resting behind Ronnie’s front door sends the couple on the rollercoaster of emotions that they have hidden from for so many years. 

After starring in countless award-winning movies, Lithgow and Danner have certainly built up a name for themselves in the film industry. Typically, the emotions they are able to portray alongside their co-stars radiate through the television screen and into the hearts of those watching. But in The Tomorrow Man, their skills simply fell flat and left me wishing to witness their true talent. 

As each repetitive scene passed by, I was constantly hoping to find some purpose or message within the storyline. The lack of deep, meaningful dialogue in the midst of such an odd plot created a movie that is never truly able to come together. Many details of the film seem to slip through the cracks and disappear forever as the time rolls on. 

While I had hoped that The Tomorrow Man would be a fresh and compelling romantic drama, I can not find myself ever recommending it as a must-see for movie night. Its lack of passion and purpose will leave you curiously staring at the blackened screen rather than one that had just held moments of love, pain, or resolution.

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