Justin Bieber’s new album encompasses his passion for singing and injustice everywhere

Martin Luther King Jr. once said, “Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere.”

This quote sets the meaning of Justin Bieber’s new album, Justice. Bieber manages to incorporate the theme of integrity in a myriad of ways throughout his album; from integrating small quotes, to an entire speech, Bieber shows his passion for justice, but also his immense growth as an artist.

I have been a big fan of Bieber since about 2011, when he released his album “Never Say Never”; eight-year-old me was immediately turned into a “Belieber” and ever since then, I cannot help but turn on his music.

Leading up to the release of this album, Bieber had posted copious candid shots of him on his Instagram, and those photos were enough to hint to me that this album was going to be good—and I was so correct.

While I am in awe of the entire album, there were a few songs that really caught my attention and my immediate liking.

The fourth song on the album, “Off My Face,” is easily one of my favorites. While the album consists of mainly upbeat tunes, this one steers away from that and brings a more mellow and calm feeling to the soundtrack while still circulating around the common theme of his mixtape.

Bieber had posted copious candid shots of him on his Instagram, and those photos were enough to hint to me that this album was going to be good—and I was so correct.”

The song starts off with just a guitar and keeps the same pattern throughout the entirety of the song. Bieber keeps his soft voice while belting about how in love he is singing, “and I don’t know how you do it, but I’m forever ruined by you.” However, later he makes it evident that he is completely wrecked by love and not heartbreak.

The tranquil sounds continue on later in the album with the song “Unstable.”

This song is similar to “Off My Face” in the sense that it continues on with a calm tone, and also resembles how in love he is with his wife, Hailey Bieber.

“Unstable” is featuring the Australian rapper Charlton Howard—his stage name known as The Kid Laroi. The two singers and their voices fit together perfectly and compliment each other extremely well. The age gap between Howard and Bieber is about ten years, but Howard’s voice is incredibly mature and extremely similar to Bieber’s.

Bieber sings about how, even in times when he was unstable, he was still loved by her and how grateful he is for that. He never felt judged nor alone, sending a valuable lesson to his listeners on what love truly is and should be.

Right in the middle of the album is a full speech by MLK, which Bieber names “MLK Interlude.” King conveys a message to his audience, and even Bieber and his listeners, saying, “You died when you refused to stand up for right. You died when you refused to stand up for truth. You died when you refused to stand up for justice.” The interlude quickly stops right after the speech ends, leaving the audience with a powerful message to truly think about and understand. 

Throughout the album, Bieber puts the connotation of love in almost all of the songs included, and the deeper meaning is shown in the quotes and speeches included by MLK.

This soundtrack is greatly moving and left me reflecting on the greater purpose and why exactly Bieber left his listeners with such moving speeches. Not only did he continue on his legacy of being a lyrical genius—in my biased opinion—but he also incorporated today’s problems and aspects of the world that demands fixing throughout the mixtape.