Merry Christmas or Happy Holidays? That is the question.

Merry Christmas or Happy Holidays?  That is the question.

Sophie Bolen, Staff Writer

This snowy season has consisted of my dad giving me a judgmental glare every time I tell a person “Happy Holidays.”

After my annoying teenage angst built up enough to boldly ask my father why in the word he was glaring, he replied with “What happened to Merry Christmas?” I opened my mouth to answer, but nothing came out.

Thinking back, I always used to say Merry Christmas, and I would constantly hear it reciprocated. I had to ponder for a long while on why our culture has been driven away from the religious saying.

I think that as social media has emerged in recent years, more people have come to voice their opinions on problems they see. Many people have spoken about how the American culture should be more sensitive to religions other than Christianity. Christian holidays dominate the holiday season with the most lights shone upon them. When people say Merry Christmas to someone who does not celebrate the holiday, it can seem insensitive.

While I myself cannot attest to being offended by the religious greeting, I can see how there can be a problem; although, I do believe the problem is misunderstood.

The saying is not the shoving of religion down your throat; it is instead a way of wishing someone peace, joy and happiness during the season.”

Also, to some people, December is just a regular month. No holidays are celebrated, period. Would the saying “Happy Holidays” be inconsiderate to them? In my opinion, no. Once again, it is a wish of well being and another way of conveying the wish of good fortune to them.

In an instance where someone told me a religious saying, I would respond in kindness, not a rant to the world on social media. They are not trying to drown me in their personal views. They are only trying to display their personal consideration and kindness.