FHC’s production of The Crucible was a success due to immense passion and utter talent

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FHC’s production of The Crucible was a success due to immense passion and utter talent

Lydia

Lydia

Lydia

From writing a lead in a profile about Rebecca Nurse’s entrance onto the stage to conducting interviews with three different cast members of FHC’s fall play The Crucible, I believed that I was rather prepared for what I was going to witness once I went and saw FHC’s fall play. 

Meredith VanSkiver, who played Abigail Williams, confessed in her Q&A interview that the actors turn into completely different people on stage. Meredith was absolutely, one-hundred percent correct, and I was definitely not prepared for the undeniable talent and passion that my peers exhibited in their performances. 

I wasn’t prepared to have goosebumps invade the surface of my skin an uncountable amount of times within only two hours. I wasn’t prepared for people I know as undeniably sweet to be perfectly evil and believably cruel. I wasn’t prepared to be entirely invested in the progression of the infamous story of the inhabitants of Salem in the 1690s going absolutely insane. 

What I did expect, however, was to be glued to the actors and their actions and engrossed in the overall experience of viewing a book I read sophomore year come to life. 

FHC Theatre: your production exceeded my expectations. 

There wasn’t a second during FHC’s production of The Crucible when I wasn’t engaged in the events occurring on stage or overwhelmed with admiration of the pure talent that FHC’s actors have.”

First, I was awestruck by the talent that the protagonists utilized in their portrayal of their characters. Standout actors—for me—were Aaron Jachim (John Proctor), Linus Kaechele (Reverend John Hale), Meredith VanSkiver (Abigail Williams), and Alexander Hahn (Deputy Governor Danforth). The raw emotion that each actor was able to transparently express to the audience was incredible, and my frustration was encouraged to grow alongside each of theirs. 

I was definitely most shocked and taken aback by the scene when Reverend John Hale is bickering with Deputy Governor Danforth, and Hale announces that he is quitting the court due to its corruption. Kaechele’s defeat and helplessness were so perfectly visible alongside his anger, and Hahn’s stubbornness perfectly embodied the characteristics of Danforth. 

The props, decorations, and layout of the set embodied the characteristics of Salem that Arthur Miller diligently described in his book. The overall appearance of the stage was simple and rustic in the best way, and I believe that simplicity being key benefitted the overall imagery within the play. An extra visual aspect I enjoyed was that the set was dusty, so when actors fell to their knees or stormed out of the room, they created a dramatic dust cloud that lingered in the air behind them. 

However, the talent each actor showed—whether they were a lead or a minor character—was the most impressive part of the entire production. To perfect something takes strenuous practice, and it was extremely evident that each actor put in the necessary time and practice to nail their role. It was so remarkable to view such a cohesive production, and the close relationship that the cast has with each other is noticeable. 

There wasn’t a second during FHC’s production of The Crucible when I wasn’t engaged in the events occurring on stage or overwhelmed with admiration of the pure talent that FHC’s actors have.