Brown Butter Creperie and Cafe from the view of a pessimist and optimist

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Sophie Bolen

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September 18, 2017
Kaley Kaminski

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An optimistic view

By: Sophie Bolen

“Gotta get crepes, gotta get crepes, gotta get crepes,” I chanted under my breath, sweaty hands gripping the steering wheel as my foot pressed deeper into the gas pedal. The hours of Brown Butter Creperie and Cafe were the only inconvenience I experienced with the one-week-old restaurant. They open at 7 a.m. and close at 7 p.m., which can be difficult for students who have zero hours, after school sports, or extracurricular activities. This led to Kaley and me rushing to the main road in Easttown: Wealthy street. Brown Butter sits atop the brick road, its European stylistic accents already becoming apparent before we even stepped foot in the creperie.

 The building’s entrance resembles a white windmill with each side adorned with antique windows. The lights from the inside caught my eye as it was a contrast with the night sky. My pace quickened as I had been waiting since they opened (exactly one week ago) to get my hands on the homemade crepes. We also arrived minutes before closing, which influenced my need to get in the doors. When I walked through the magenta door, the ambiance was exactly as how I imagined it would be. The antiqued building was filled with the voice of John Mayer and the chatter of East Town twenty-somethings conversing above the steam of their freshly brewed coffee. The building itself was not clean and pristine; it was, in fact, a little dirty in the essence that it was an older building that was remodeled. The old features were apparent in aspects such as some of the archways and the wall paneling. The “old factor” did not draw me away, though; it, in fact, pulled me closer. The building is adorned with black and white walls, rustic wood pallets, honeycomb lights, succulents, and fauna. The main wall was decorated with a sign that read “from scratch with love,” which is a staple mantra from the business’ earliest beginnings. The business actually began a very humble beginning as a food truck. Add the homey decorations and the knowledge of the love and hard work it took the restaurant to get where it was today, and I was already obsessed.

 By the time I had parallel parked on the street, Kaley was already in the restaurant ordering herself the cinnamon and sugar crepe and graciously ordering me the blueberry crepe. Little did I know the blueberry crepe was called the Blueberry Goat. It surprisingly had goat cheese in between the folds of the crepe, as I found out after my tongue retreated back in my mouth in disgust as I found out it wasn’t in fact whipped cream as I initially thought. The sour taste of the goat cheese completely contrasted the flavor of the rest of the sweet, dessert-esque crepe. Adding goat cheese to the blueberry crepe was like putting ketchup on mac and cheese, or ranch dressing on pizza. For me, it was disgusting, and to others, it was heaven on earth. After the initial encounter with the peculiar addition to my crepe, I took a few more bites, hoping my palate would become used to the taste. Unfortunately, it did not. So, I just scraped it off and continued to enjoy the doughy crepe adorned with juicy blueberries and sprinkled with powdered sugar. My crepe was truly delicious.

 Overall, I am a huge fan of Brown Butter Creperie and Cafe. I plan to return to the little shop with a book, some homework, or the company of friends. When I go back, I will most likely try something that is completely sweet, such as the France (Nutella, fresh strawberries and whipped cream), the Campfire (peanut butter, graham crackers, torched marshmallow, chocolate sauce, whipped cream), or even a waffle. If I don’t have a sweet tooth the day I return, that’s okay, because the restaurant has savory sandwiches such as crepes, paninis, salads or quiche. The array of choices, both savory and sweet (and goat cheese), have something to please everyone’s taste buds. The food was delicious, and the imperfections and quirks in the building made Brown Butter Creperie and Cafe a truly unique place to eat.

 

 A Pessimistic View

By Kaley Kaminski

Recently, during a usual busy night, I took a visit to a new cafe called Brown Butter Creperie and Cafe. Although the small setting gave off a cozy feel, it also gave off a rustic vibe– but not in the “hipster cool” way. I walked into the little eating house hoping to find a new place to chat with friends or a place to complete homework along with a tasty treat, but I left feeling unsatisfied.

The workers make the food in a display behind a translucent glass for customers to watch them prepare their treats. I did enjoy this experience, because crepes are made in an incredibly entertaining manner. The batter is poured onto a hot plate and then is twirled around in a circle creating a thinly spread layer of a pancake.

I ordered a cinnamon and sugar sweet crepe, and my taste buds were ready to explore the sweet side of the food spectrum. My specific crepe was $4.75, so it is a reasonably priced restaurant. I was pleasantly surprised by my dish when it was served to me. A fellow customer described it as “looking like a piece of pizza.” As I took my first bite, I was surprised by the fact that I liked it. I don’t like trying many new foods, and a crepe sprinkled in cinnamon and sugar crystals seemed too fancy for my liking. As I continued eating, I became displeased with the taste.  It tasted as if it were a serving of french toast that contained a heavy portion of eggs. Needless to say, I did not finish my meal and felt slightly sick to my stomach after attempting to complete it.

My first impression of the cafe was that it was a charming, modest cafe. The interior has white walls, a black ceiling, and sandy wood tables. I think brighter, happier colors should be incorporated more throughout the building.  I spotted the entryway to the kitchen, which would not have been an eyesore until I detected the “door” to be a shower curtain. I feel they were trying to be trendy but ended up looking unprofessional.

Overall, I would not recommend going to Brown Butter Creperie and Cafe. I feel it is not worth the time spent driving to the cramped, little cafe. I also feel like it is not worth spending the money and possibly obtaining a stomach ache like I did.

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