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The Student Voice of Forest Hills Central

The Central Trend

The Student Voice of Forest Hills Central

The Central Trend

The Student Voice of Forest Hills Central

The Central Trend

Social media’s self-proclaimed “hippie” hysteria is a problem

Hippie+vans+had+become+a+statement+and+way+for+the+youth+to+rebel+against+norms+in+the+70s.
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Hippie vans had become a statement and way for the youth to rebel against norms in the 70’s.

Between social media and just walking around in public, I have seen an increasing amount of patchwork pants that most people would consider part of “hippie” fashion. Seeing this increase in particular fashion choices and an increase in people self-proclaiming themselves as “hippies” has made me wonder if people actually know what being a “hippie” is and if these fashion statements are being ethically bought.

Hippies first surfaced in the 1960s and 1970s as a countercultural movement that rejected America’s mainstream life and ideals. Generally, they believed in peace, love, nonviolence, freedom, personal expression, and taking care of the earth. Being a hippie was not about how one dresses or their aesthetic, but one’s lifestyle, mindset, and how they treated others; meanwhile, being a “hippie” has sort of just become an aesthetic, and the true purpose of it has seemed to have been forgotten in a sense.

The self-proclaimed “hippies” that I keep coming across on social media platforms such as TikTok and Instagram appear to be a mix and match, appropriating other cultures such as Africans, Native Americans, and Romanians, and claiming the clothing as “hippie” fashion; being a hippie is not about what one wears, but if one was to give it a style, it falls under the bohemian category. Along with that is the fact that actual “hippies” do not tend to actually call themselves hippies. When hippies first surfaced, many referred to themselves as “flower children,” “love children,” and “freaks,” and the term “hippie” was actually a derogatory term for those who did not agree with the lifestyle. 

A big part of the hippie mindset and bohemian aesthetic is the use of organic elements and nature, so when styles like this are purchased from places like Shein, Romwe, Asos, and even sometimes Amazon, it destroys the purpose of the style.

When it comes to the popular new patchwork pants and other bohemian styles, self-expression is great, but the place where they are being purchased is very important. A big part of the hippie mindset and bohemian aesthetic is the use of organic elements and nature, so when styles like this are purchased from places like Shein, Romwe, Asos, and even sometimes Amazon, it destroys the purpose of the style. When it comes to dressing in this free-spirited style, one of the best places that is ethically sourced, sustainable, and even sometimes handcrafted is The Little Bazaar. While the clothes are expensive, it is a lot better for the environment than fast fashion sites selling the same style of clothes, and the quality is amazing. Other than The Little Bazaar, various small business Etsy shops are also a good place to find your bohemian needs without supporting the fast fashion industry.

There is nothing wrong with people on social media who claim to be a hippie if they actually participate in the hippie lifestyle. However, people who dress in “hippie” clothes from Shein and look like they searched “hippie aesthetic” on Pinterest and tried to replicate it exactly without actually participating in the lifestyle and not ethically buying it are the problem. People like that damage the community and give actual naturalists a bad rap. 

Being a hippie is not about how much money you do or don’t have, how you eat, or how you dress, but about how you treat the environment and those around you.

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About the Contributor
Litany Gaines, Staff Writer
Litany Gaines is a senior entering her first year on The Central Trend. Since she was young, Litany has had a love for words, whether it be reading, writing, poetry, or song lyrics, and she is beyond excited to further her writing skills this year. In her free time, Litany enjoys being outside and spending time with friends along with reading and writing. During her final year in high school, Litany hopes to create many memories and strive to be her best before setting off on her next path in life. Favorite poet: Sappho Favorite movie: My Neighbor Totoro or Coraline Favorite Time: 11:11 am Her Car: A 2002 Pontiac Grand Prix named Daisy Jones that is somehow still running  

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