The Central Trend

No Tomorrow expands upon the usual romantic comedy cliches

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In its essence, the CW show No Tomorrow is an embodiment of the cliche phrase “opposites attract.” Evie Callahan (Tori Anderson) is someone who never steps out of line and when given the choice, will always choose the safe and easy route. But when fate puts the mysterious and wild Xavier Holliday (Joshua Sasse) in her path, all of those ideas go out the window.

While this show sounds exactly like every other romantic comedy show ever created, there’s actually a catch to the perfect setup: Xavier believes that the world is ending in eight months and that the apocalypse is nigh. Although taken aback by this at first, Evie quickly enters the craziness and decides to live her life more epically by helping Xavier with his bucket list, even though she’s not totally certain that she believes his theories. This twist in the story sets up two parallel plotlines in the story, and as it goes along, you watch the perfectly crazy adventures of Evie and Xavier, while simultaneously watching other misadventures that involve Xavier’s conspiracy theories, Evie’s coworkers, and other subjects. 

No Tomorrow was an addicting show for me to watch because I’m a sucker for romantic comedies. The uniqueness of this story compared to others was actually refreshing, and I was hooked on seeing every new installment in Xavier and Evie’s stories. Outside of their stories, I also loved the random side characters that add extra comedy to the show, like Evie’s coworkers Hank (Jonathan Langdon) and Kareema (Sarayu Blue). In all honesty, I definitely liked the supporting roles more than Xavier and Evie because sometimes, the main characters were a little too over the top for me. At points, Evie is a relatable character because she is just longing to be more adventurous and outgoing; however, I found myself getting more annoyed than not with her later in the series.

Overall, I thoroughly enjoyed No Tomorrow. I loved everything from the sheer randomness to the fact that it is a romantic comedy with all the cliche themes in it. By the end of the series, I realized that I was somewhat attached to all of the characters because of their quirkiness. Unfortunately, the series ended season one on a major cliffhanger and then decided to terminate the show after only one season. However, No Tomorrow is definitely worth a watch, despite all the cliches and occasional annoyances.

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About the Writer
Susannah Bennett, Editor in Chief

Susannah is a senior who is going into her third year writing for The Central Trend. Despite this being her last year in high school and on staff, she...

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No Tomorrow expands upon the usual romantic comedy cliches