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The Student Voice of Forest Hills Central

The Central Trend

The Student Voice of Forest Hills Central

The Central Trend

The Student Voice of Forest Hills Central

The Central Trend

Culver’s Kids Meals are underrated but should be more commonly consumed

My+friends+and+I+excitedly+awaiting+our+Culvers+Kids+Meals.++
Autumn VanSolkema
My friends and I excitedly awaiting our Culver’s Kids Meals.

I am usually a believer in trying new things and getting out of my comfort zone, except when it comes to one thing: Culvers.

For the past six years, I have been a regular customer of one of the most popular fast-food chains in the Midwest. Since I have been dining there for so long many would assume that I have tried most of the menu, but actually, it is the opposite. I have only ever gotten one meal from there— the Culvers Kids Meal.

The kid’s meal consists of an entree, a side, a drink, and a free scoop of custard. For the main portion of the meal, you can choose: two chicken tenders, a butterburger, grilled cheese, or a corn dogs. For the side, you can either get a small fry or applesauce. The drink can either be a small soft drink with free refills, chocolate or milk, or apple juice. Lastly, the custard can be ordered as either vanilla or chocolate or flavor of the day with one free topping. My go-to order usually consists of chicken tenders, fries, a Dr. Pepper soft drink, and a vanilla and Oreo custard. 

The name Kids Meal tends to attract children—hence the name—and most restaurants don’t allow adults to order off the kid’s menu; however, Culvers allows people of any age to order from that menu. The portions may seem small, but as someone who can’t usually finish my plate when ordering an adult meal, the smaller meal suits my eating habits perfectly. After eating the meal, and finishing it off with custard, I am usually filled for the remainder of the day, and not in an uncomfortable way; rather I feel satisfyingly complete. 

Most fast-food restaurants make me feel gross and bloated after I eat their food; Culver’s on the other hand leaves me sated and pleased. 

Since I have been dining there for so long many would assume that I have tried most of the menu, but actually, it is the opposite. I have only ever gotten one meal from there— the Culvers Kids Meal.

Another positive thing about the kid’s meal offered at Culver’s is it costs much less than what an adult-size meal would cost there. One kid’s meal will cost $7.41 with taxes whereas a meal on the adult menu—with all the same items and a custard—costs $12.43 taxes included.

It makes no sense to purchase a value basket on the adult menu; it costs way more for the same product. When purchasing off of the kids menu you are saving five dollars and two cents. That money could be better allocated to many different things: a Starbucks drink, four items from Dollar Tree, or a savings fund. 

If someone who typically gets a value basket were to order Culver’s two times a month they would spend around twenty-five dollars a month and three-hundred dollars a year. If they switched to ordering a kid’s meal instead, about one hundred dollars would be saved a year. That is basically free money you could be getting. 

Along with being cheaper, buying Culver’s Kids Meals can earn you a free meal. If you purchase ten meals and save the Scoopie Tokens that come with each bag, you can either get one free kids’ meal or a toy. Currently, I have about six tokens in my car and am waiting to get the other four so I can go buy myself a free meal. I also have four free scoop tokens in my phone case. If I don’t use them with my meal, I save them for a time when I want to get a sweet treat for free from my favorite fast food restaurant. I think that it should be more commonly accepted at all restaurants for adults and teenagers to order food off of the kid’s meal. In most of my experience, it is better, cheaper, and comes in more manageable portions to eat.

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About the Contributor
Juliana Lieuwen
Juliana Lieuwen, Staff Writer
Juliana is a junior entering her first year on The Central Trend. She loves sunsets and spending time with her rabbit Snickers. When she isn't at school you can find her at 5 High Farms, the place where she rides horses. Juliana is also on the FHC Equestrian team and is busy with that in the fall. She loves to sing and dance to music by Taylor Swift. When she isn't busy with horses or school, she loves drawing, hanging out with friends, and shopping. She is so excited to be writing for The Central Trend this year. Favorite food: Sushi Favorite color: Hot Pink Her pets: Two chickens, one cat, one dog, one bunny Favorite song: "You Belong with Me" by Taylor Swift Favorite numbers: 3 and 7

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