Books and e-books both have their benefits, but one is ultimately better

I have personally always prefered print books to ebooks.

I have personally always prefered print books to ebooks.

For as long as I can remember, I have passionately adored reading. Even when it was just picture books or fifty-page chapter books, I have never found a fault in reading. 

As I’ve grown and matured, my passion for reading has only grown. It has gotten to the point where certain songs will come on that I had been listening to while reading a certain book and my mind will immediately begin thinking about the book. One prime example is that whenever I hear “Don’t Blame Me” by Taylor Swift, I will forever think of Twilight, which I was reading for the first time when the song came out.

Being the avid reader that I am, I have been offered an e-book various times. In theory, it would be much simpler to have all of my books in one spot that wasn’t so heavy. 

E-books have rapidly been gaining popularity over the years. People view them as an alternative option for going to the library or bookstore, effectively providing a cheaper way to read. You could read anywhere, any time, assuming you take the e-book with you. An almost infinite amount of reading material would be at your fingertips whenever you please.

Along with that, consider the environmental aspect. It is estimated that the United States book and newspaper industries together require 125 million trees annually. E-books, in addition to not involving paper and therefore trees, also don’t need ink or glue. Moreover, because all of the books would be on a tablet of sorts, a bookshelf and all of its materials would not be demanded either. This successfully provides extra space for other things.

Despite all of that, it has actually been found that real, paper books are better for the average reader. Research proves that, when reading a printed book, people tend to gain and keep more information than if it were an e-book. In 2014, there was a research study that showed those who read paper books scored higher for engagement and understanding of the plot.

It is ultimately a personal choice for which you prefer, but I will always choose print, if only for the nostalgic feeling of opening yet another book, being able to flip through its pages, and the satisfaction of slamming it shut when finished.”

Printed books also contribute more physical interaction, what with flipping the pages and holding them. On a less scientific note, people also find the feeling of carrying a real book to be more pleasurable and sentimental than an e-book. 

Printed books are also healthier for your eyes. Reading from a bright screen can make eyes work harder. People tend to blink less frequently, which can make your eyes sore and dry. The illumination of the screen is cause for further concern because it tires our eyes at a more rapid pace. Headaches are also a common occurrence when staring at any screen for long periods of time. This all leads to discomfort while reading, which should ultimately be a soothing, restful activity.

While e-books require the internet and chargers, print books do not. Because of this, one could argue that print books are the more convenient way to read, despite the fact that they could be heavier and bigger.

I have always preferred paper books. I don’t necessarily have anything against e-books, but I find that they don’t work well for me. I’m more likely to get distracted and not pay as much attention to the plot; this is also true for others who read from e-books.

It is ultimately a personal choice for which you prefer, but I will always choose print, if only for the nostalgic feeling of opening yet another book, being able to flip through its pages, and the satisfaction of slamming it shut when finished.