Madison Beer’s newest singles are the beginning of a new era for her

Madison Beer's newest singles are the beginning of a new era for her

The whimsical, majestic intro to Madison Beer’s newest single, “Selfish,” is a work of art in itself.

The soft nature of the song is something completely different then anything Beer has ever released before. The song has Disney-like energy, adding to the magical feel of the underlying music. The soft piano paired with Beer’s melodic voice creates a beautiful ballad of self advocation.

The lyrics are a beautiful fit for Beer’s vocal capabilities.

The soft sound of the music creates a rift between the harsh lyrics but somehow manages to sound calming and soothing.

“Selfish” is the last of Beer’s tracks to be released before her newest album, Life Support, which will be released March 27.

The song depicts an image of bravery.

Beer’s lyrics have weaved themself into a quilt of sticking up for herself. With lyrics like “plus I’m not responsible/for your self-made obstacles” and “I bet you thought you gave me real love/but we spent it all in night clubs,” Beer calls out her past lover for not giving her what she deserves, and this is her way of saying she doesn’t want someone who isn’t what she needs.

Someone who is selfish.

While “Selfish” possesses softer tendencies in its underlying tone, “Good in Goodbye” sits on the other side of the music spectrum.

Beer’s other single, “Good in Goodbye,” sounds more like her other music, with similar vibes to “Dear Society.”

The downplayed electronic sound of “Good in Goodbye” contrasts greatly with the soft, melodic tendencies of “Selfish,” ”

Upon first listening, it appears the song is just your typical song about being betrayed and hurt by a past lover, but once watching the futuristic music video, the real meaning behind the song becomes clear.

Beer’s music video features two different versions of herself fighting, as if her two sides are involved in an altercation, and even she is waiting to see who will win.

It becomes slightly more clear that the song isn’t a typical breakup song, but that this man that broke her heart when, whoever it is, caused the two sides of herself to be at war, fighting over what they thought was best for her. With lyrics like, “you put the ‘over’ in lover, put the ‘ex’ in next,” and “ain’t no ‘I’ in trouble/just the ‘u’ since we met,” light is shed on the fact that this man tore her apart into pieces, much like her heart.

The downplayed electronic sound of “Good in Goodbye” contrasts greatly with the soft, melodic tendencies of “Selfish,” but I can’t bring myself to dislike the variety in her music; in fact, I find it quite amazing that she can master both styles at such a young age.

I can’t help but wonder if the two songs are written about a singular being; if they are, I hope Beer continues to draw inspiration from this heartbreak in her new music.